The current C.O.S.H.H. regulations require companies utilising equipment that generates dusts and fumes to provide local exhaust ventilation (LEV) in order to capture and remove these hazards from the workplace.

Wood dusts are no exception to this rule and typical methods of machining and shaping wooden materials generates quantities of dust that are both a health and safety risk, due to the potential to breathe the dust and then enter the lungs, as well as potentially causing some skin diseases. Serious non-reversible health problems such as asthma and forms of cancer can be caused by the wood dust being breathed or coming into contact with your skin. In addition wood dust in certain circumstances is explosive as well as being flammable. Therefore these airborne dust must be captured and removed from the air in order to prevent these hazards. A health and safety executive guidance sheet reference number 23 revision 2 provides an overview of the requirements of the legislation and recommended good working practices. Further documentation and references are also noted in the document.

Case Studies

Case Study 1

Woodwaste extraction filters come in many guises where they can be either placed under positive or negative pressure dependent upon the positioning of the fan…

Woodwaste extraction filters come in many guises where they can be either placed under positive or negative pressure dependent upon the positioning of the fan. Under positive pressure the equipment can be made in a lighter gauge material but unfortunately the air will pass through the fan and therefore will have to be of a self-cleaning type which is predominantly of a lower efficiency than those placed on the outgoing side of the filter. The latter however require heavy gauge casings in order to withstand the high negative pressure. Air from the filter unit can be returned back to the factory once clean enabling reduction in energy consumption and the discharge from the filter can be directed into various forms of collection facility. In this instance the customer provided a secondary transfer system to convey the collected material from the filter discharge into an adjacent storage facility. An alternative bypass system into collection bags was provided for when the skips/storage container were being emptied…

Case Study 2

We can supply filter systems for woodworking processes either under positive or negative condition with options to return the air back into the filter factory after cleaning…

We can supply filter systems for woodworking processes either under positive or negative condition with options to return the air back into the filter factory after cleaning. Discharge from the base of the unit could be directly into skips or alternatively via a transfer system into separate collection containers. In either instance units would need to be provided with explosion release panels due to the nature of the material being handled and these would be discharged into a safe area. Fans can be either mounted directly on the filter unit or alongside at floor level.

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